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Alex The Lesbian Cowgirl - Framed Canvas Sapphic Art Posters Prints & Visual
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Alex The Lesbian Cowgirl - Sapphic Art Lgbtq Artists Posters Prints & Visual
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Alex The Lesbian Cowgirl - Sapphic Art Phone Case Iphone 14 / Matte Mobile
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Anahita The Lesbian Cowgirl - Framed Canvas Sapphic Art Posters Prints & Visual
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Anahita The Lesbian Cowgirl - Sapphic Art Lgbtq Artists Posters Prints & Visual
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Anahita The Lesbian Cowgirl - Sapphic Art Phone Case Iphone 14 / Matte Mobile
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Dai Lu The Lesbian Cowgirl - Framed Canvas Sapphic Art Posters Prints & Visual
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Dai Lu The Lesbian Cowgirl - Sapphic Art Lgbtq Artists Posters Prints & Visual
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Helena The Lesbian Cowgirl - Sapphic Art Lgbtq Artists Posters Prints & Visual
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Helena The Lesbian Cowgirl - Sapphic Art Phone Case Iphone 14 / Matte Mobile
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Imani The Lesbian Cowgirl - Framed Canvas Sapphic Art Posters Prints & Visual
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Imani The Lesbian Cowgirl - Sapphic Art Lgbtq Artists Posters Prints & Visual

Lesbian Cowgirl Art

Lesbian Cowgirl Art Collection: A Journey into the Vintage West

Vintage Cowgirl Aesthetics

Step into the world of the old west with our Lesbian Cowgirl Art Collection. This collection is a tribute to the vintage cowgirl aesthetic, a timeless style that embodies strength, independence, and rugged charm AKA just our type.

Each piece in this collection is a celebration of the cowgirl spirit, queering up the classic 1930s South Western aesthetic that got cartoonified to become the 1950s cowgirl aesthetic that we all know and love. But for us, it's always been the 1930s — the last days of the Wild West and the travelling circuses with covered wagons and hand painted signage. Before the world went all modern and everyone got fridges and TVs and washer dryer sets.

So buckle up and ride back in time to a reimagined queer past...

Luxurious Framed Canvas Prints

Our collection doesn't stop at fine art prints. We offer framed luxurious cotton canvas prints that bring the vintage cowgirl aesthetic to life. These prints, framed with care and precision, are perfect for adding a touch of western style to your living space. The high-quality cotton canvas enhances the vibrancy of the colors, making each print a standout piece of art.

Designer Phone Cases

In addition to prints, our Lesbian Cowgirl Art Collection extends to designer iPhone and Samsung cases. These cases feature stunning designs inspired by vintage cowgirl and lesbian stories, making them not just protective covers for your phone, but a statement of your unique style. Each case is a blend of functionality and art, ensuring your phone is safe while looking chic.

FAQs

Lesbian cowgirl culture carves out a space where history and identity collide, crafting a narrative far richer than the stereotypes of dusty boots and lassos. It delves into the lives of women who defied traditional gender roles, combining the rugged individualism of the American cowgirl with the authenticity that comes from embracing one's true self.

As historians trace these stories, they uncover tales of resilience and community that challenge mainstream views. Venturing into the untamed plains of history where lesbian cowgirls carved their own paths alongside iconic horseback heroes. The valiant tales of these women challenge traditional narratives, reshaping our understanding of the American West.

The history of lesbian cowgirls is not as well-documented as it should be, but there are a few notable figures who have been identified as lesbian or bisexual and have connections to the cowboy lifestyle or the American West.

  1. Belle StarrCalamity Jane, and Annie Oakley are strong women who worked hard, handled powerful animals and weapons, and took part in one of America’s defining moments on the Plains. While their sexual orientations are not definitively known, they straddled a number of sexual, cultural, and class ambiguities.
  2. Jennifer Vrana is known as the winningest cowgirl in gay rodeo history.
  3. Jack Bee Garland (also known as Elvira Virginia Mugarrieta and Babe Bean) was a Mexican-American who lived in California at the turn of the century. Garland was assigned female at birth but lived as a man and was periodically arrested for wearing men’s clothing.
  4. Sammy Williams, an 80-year-old lumberjack who died in Montana in 1908, was discovered to be female by the undertaker, surprising the community that had only ever known him as a man.
  5. Harry Allen was a dashing cowboy who dressed sharply and kept his hair trim. He was a lady killer, a bootlegger, a bronco-buster.

While not all of these women are confirmed lesbians, they all challenged gender norms and societal expectations in ways that resonate with the experiences of many lesbian women. They represent a spirit of independence and resilience that is a significant part of the emerging history of lesbian cowgirls and pioneer women.

The history of cowgirls in the American West is marked by several significant events that highlight their contributions and challenges in a traditionally male-dominated environment. Here are some of the most notable events:

  1. Emergence of Cowgirls (Late 1800s): The term "cowgirl" first appeared in print in the early 1890s, reflecting the emergence of women who worked on ranches and participated in rodeos. Unlike their urban counterparts who were restricted to traditional female roles, women of the American West were roping and riding broncs. Daughters of pioneer ranchers grew up riding and roping alongside their brothers, contributing significantly to ranch work.
  2. Wild West Shows (Late 19th Century): Wild West Shows in the late 19th century provided a platform for cowgirls to showcase their skills. Women like Annie Oakley and Lucile Mulhall, who was the first woman to be called a cowgirl, performed in these shows, exhibiting their riding skills and skillful marksmanship.
  3. First Woman to Ride a Bronc at the Cheyenne Frontier (1904): In 1904, Bertha (Kaepernik) Blancett became the first woman to ride a bronc at the Cheyenne Frontier. As rodeos gained popularity, producers capitalized on the novelty of special exhibitions and women who rode broncs.
  4. Mabel Strickland's Steer-Roping Titles (1920s): Mabel Strickland won steer-roping titles in Cheyenne and Pendleton in the 1920s, but the rodeo cowgirl was already being slowly replaced by the “ranch girl,” predecessor to rodeo queens.
  5. Formation of the Girls Rodeo Association (1948): In response to the relegation of female performers to trick riding and beauty contests, 38 female ropers, bronc riders, and barrel racers came together in San Angelo, Texas, on Feb. 28, 1948, and created the Girls Rodeo Association.
  6. Establishment of the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame: The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame in Fort Worth, Texas, was established to honor women who helped shape the American West. The museum holds over 5,000 objects in their collection, over 6,000 historic and modern images of women honored by the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame, and a library containing over 2,000 books and serial titles documenting the history of women as pioneers, ranchers, and performers.

These events underscore the resilience, skill, and determination of cowgirls in the American West, demonstrating their significant contributions to the frontier lifestyle and challenging traditional gender roles.

The latest and most significant findings about cowgirls reveal a nuanced and evolving role of women in the American West, challenging traditional narratives and highlighting their contributions to the frontier lifestyle. Here are some key insights:

  • Historical Roles: Women in the American West were not confined to traditional female roles. Daughters of pioneer ranchers grew up riding and roping alongside their brothers, contributing significantly to ranch work.
  • Cowgirl Identity: The term "cowgirl" first appeared in print in the early 1890s, reflecting the emergence of women who worked on ranches and participated in rodeos.
  • Documentary Insights: The documentary "Bitterbrush" provides an intimate portrayal of the lives of contemporary cowgirls, showcasing the challenges and transitions they face while working in the isolated landscapes of the American West.
  • Changing Roles: Exhibits like "Not Just a Housewife: The Changing Roles of Women in the West" explore the diverse careers women pursued, from artists to rodeo personalities, which were often considered unconventional.
  • Visibility and Recognition: Despite their significant contributions, cowgirls have historically been less visible than their male counterparts. Efforts to document their stories, such as Teresa Jordan's book "Cowgirls," aim to address this invisibility.
  • Real-Life Cowgirls: Photographs and stories of real cowgirls, like those captured by Todd Klassy, challenge the stereotypical and often sexualized images portrayed by popular media, emphasizing their hard work and equal capabilities alongside men.
  • Women's Opportunities: The American West offered women opportunities that were not available in the East, such as land ownership and a break from strict social rules.
  • Famous Cowgirls: The National Cowgirl Museum highlights women who have left their mark on history, celebrating female riders and athletes who have become as commonplace as cowboys.

These findings underscore the importance of cowgirls in shaping the American West, demonstrating their resilience, skill, and determination in a traditionally male-dominated environment. The evolving narrative of cowgirls continues to inspire and redefine the cultural landscape of the West.

While the concept of a "cowgirl" is deeply rooted in the culture and history of the American West, it's important to note that not all cultures have a direct equivalent. However, there are women in various cultures around the world who engage in activities that might be considered similar to those of a cowgirl. Such as, herding livestock or demonstrating skills in horsemanship.

Here are some examples:

  1. Mongolian Horsewomen: In Mongolia, a country known for its nomadic culture and deep-rooted equestrian traditions, women often participate in horse riding and herding activities. They may not be referred to as "cowgirls" in the Western sense, but their roles and skills are comparable.
  2. Tibetan Drokpa Women: In the high-altitude regions of Tibet, Drokpa (nomadic) women play a crucial role in herding yaks and other livestock, a task that requires significant equestrian skills.
  3. Kazakh Horsewomen: In Kazakhstan, another Central Asian country with a strong nomadic heritage, women are often skilled horse riders and may participate in traditional games and activities that involve horsemanship.
  4. Maasai Women: In the Maasai culture of East Africa, women play a crucial role in the maintenance and care of livestock, which is a central aspect of their semi-nomadic lifestyle. While they may not typically herd the cattle, their roles in livestock care are essential to the community.
  5. Fulani Women: The Fulani people are a large ethnic group in West Africa and the Sahel who are traditionally nomadic cattle herders. Women in these communities often participate in the care and milking of the cattle.
  6. Himba Women: In Namibia, women of the Himba ethnic group often participate in the herding of goats and cattle, a key part of their semi-nomadic lifestyle.
  7. Dinka and Nuer Women: In South Sudan, women from the Dinka and Nuer ethnic groups often participate in cattle herding and care. Cattle have significant cultural and economic importance in these communities.
  8. Hungarian Herdswomen: The Great Hungarian Plain is often referred to as Europe's answer to the American West, complete with rough-and-tumble herdsmen and women, and horses trained to lie flat on command. The Hungarian cow herders, known as "gulyás", are considered the closest European equivalent to American cowboys and cowgirls.

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We gladly accept returns and exchanges on our in-house treasure that ships worldwide, but our USA only suppliers do not offer refunds, so we can't offer refunds on their pieces either.

We also don't offer returns, refunds or exchanges on discounted / sale items unless they arrived damaged or faulty.

And we can't pay for return shipping for changes of heart. If we did we'd have to raise our prices, and we're all about artisan treasure at fair prices, fair trade and fair profit.

Learn more about our step-by-step returns process.Check product pages for returns eligibility

...

We gladly accept returns and exchanges on our in-house treasure that ships worldwide, but our USA only suppliers do not offer refunds, so we can't offer refunds on their pieces either.

We also don't offer returns, refunds or exchanges on discounted / sale items unless they arrived damaged or faulty.

And we can't pay for return shipping for changes of heart. If we did we'd have to raise our prices, and we're all about artisan treasure at fair prices, fair trade and fair profit.

Learn more about our step-by-step returns process.