Curate This

Curate This

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Armando The Gay Astronaut - Queercore Aesthetic Phone Case - Mobile Phone Cases - Aesthetic Art
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Eskandar The Gay Astronaut - Gay Aesthetic Art Phone Case - Iphone 14 / Matte - Mobile Phone Cases - Aesthetic Art
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Estephan - Gay Latino Cowboy Art Print - Vaquero Queerart - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Jacy - Gay Native American Cowboy Art Print - Queerart Dandy - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Rashid - Gay Arabic Cowboy Art Print - Muslim Queerart Dandy - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Prince Wesley - Afroamerican Gay Black Royalty Queerart - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Prince Isaiah - Afroamerican Gay Black Royalty Queerart - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Prince Rajanikanta - Gay India Tamil Royalty Queerart Print - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Prince Khaliun - Mongolian Gaysian Royalty Queerart Print - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Prince Chakri - Gaysian Thai Royalty Dandy Queerart Print - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Prince Kaniyan - Gay India Tamil Royalty Queerart Print - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art
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Prince Alfonso - Gay Spanish Royalty Hispanic Queerart Print - 30’x30’ - Posters Prints & Visual Artwork - Aesthetic Art

FAQs

Let's face it, most art is... a bit safe. Pretty, maybe even thought-provoking, but rarely does it make your feet lift off the ground as your consciousness floats into the clouds. This LGBTQ+ art, though? It's vibrant, joyful and absolutely refuses to apologize for itself.

Think classic portraiture – those stoic oil paintings of historical figures – now injected with defiant energy. Reclaiming history by celebrating queer heroes who were forced into the shadows. Each a middle finger to those old, dull rules about who gets to be seen and celebrated.

Now, there's this gorgeous tension in some of these works - a vintage aesthetic, like a sepia-toned memory, clashing with bold, modern themes. It's a reminder that queerness isn't some newfangled trend. It's always been with us, sometimes hidden, but always burning bright beneath the surface.

Here's the thing: this art isn't just decorative. It's protection from the mundane. Hang a queer art print, slap a design on your phone case, and boom - you've started a revolution, even if it's just in your living room. You're making a statement about bravery, love, and the undeniable right to exist exactly as you are.

But maybe there's a subtle danger here. If everything becomes a political statement, does that lessen the power? Does the art get lost in the act of defiance? That's where the true brilliance lies, I suppose – pieces that are both incredibly beautiful and an in-your-face proclamation of identity all at once.

Of course. Art has always been a means of self-expression and storytelling, and LGBTQ folks have always existed. So art in ancient times was influenced by queer folk because we're the best artists around, after all. Always have been, always will be. From Greek vase paintings to Japanese woodblock prints, various art forms have showcased the diverse experiences and identities of LGBTQ individuals throughout history.

In ancient Greece, male-male relationships were common, and homoeroticism was reflected in their art. Greek vase paintings depicted scenes of masculinity, including athletic activities, and often included same-sex couples. These paintings were not considered taboo, and they were widely accepted as a norm in ancient Greek society.

In ancient Greece, Alcaeus and Sappho introduced themes of same-sex love and relationships in poetry and art, considered revolutionary for their time.

Roman mosaics included representations of same-sex relationships, showcasing non-conformity to traditional gender roles. The art form utilized intricate designs and geometric patterns to convey their messaging.

Japanese woodblock prints had also depicted gender-fluidity and same-sex relationships among its subjects.

Ancient Chinese art also showcased same-sex relationships among emperors and their male favorites.

These art forms provided a glimpse into the diverse experiences of LGBTQ individuals in ancient times. They served as a means of documentation and representation, shedding light on a marginalized community and their struggles. The appreciation for and understanding of LGBTQ art in ancient times is crucial for comprehending the complexities of history and the evolution of LGBTQ representation.

Camp culture is a vital aspect of LGBTQ+ expression, and it has played a significant role in shaping queer aesthetics in art, decor, and fashion. It is a style that celebrates excess, theatricality, and exaggeration, embracing the idea that "bad taste" can actually be good art.

The concept of camp culture originated in the 19th century as a response to the strict social norms of the time. It gained popularity in the LGBTQ+ community during the 1960s, particularly with the rise of drag culture and the Stonewall riots.

Camp culture has evolved over time, becoming more nuanced and complex. It has influenced various artistic movements, from pop art and surrealism to postmodernism and contemporary art. Camp culture has also had a significant impact on the world of fashion, inspiring designers to create bold, daring, and sometimes outrageous styles.

Examples of Camp Culture in LGBTQ+ Expression

There are many examples of camp culture in LGBTQ+ expression, ranging from classic Hollywood films to modern-day drag shows. Some iconic examples include:

Film/TV

Some Like It Hot

Divine in Pink Flamingos

Paris Is Burning

Art

Andy Warhol's Marilyn Monroe prints

Jeff Koons' Balloon Dog sculpture

Yayoi Kusama's polka-dot installations

Fashion

Jeremy Scott's Moschino collections

Bob Mackie's outrageous costumes for Cher

RuPaul's Drag Race contestant looks

Camp culture has also influenced interior design and home decor, with many queer artists and designers incorporating camp elements into their work.

The Significance of Camp Culture in Queer Expression

Camp culture is important to LGBTQ+ expression because it allows individuals to embrace their identities in a playful, fun, and sometimes irreverent way. It challenges traditional norms of beauty and taste, rejecting the notion that there is one correct way to be "normal."

Camp culture can be a powerful tool for queer activism as well, allowing individuals to use humor and satire to critique social norms and promote LGBTQ+ rights. It has also helped to create a sense of community among LGBTQ+ individuals, providing a common language and shared experience.

Overall, camp culture is an essential aspect of queer expression, offering a space for LGBTQ+ individuals to celebrate their identities and challenge societal expectations.

Throughout history, LGBTQ+ artists have used a variety of codes and symbols to subtly express their queerness in societies that were often unaccepting or unaware. This coded language allowed them to communicate their identities and experiences without explicitly stating them, thus avoiding potential backlash or censorship.

One of the most common ways LGBTQ+ artists expressed their queerness was through the use of visual codes and symbols. These could be subtle nods to queer culture or more overt references that would only be understood by those within the community. For example, Oscar Wilde and his circle famously wore a green carnation as a signifier of their identities.

In the realm of visual arts, the figure of St Sebastian is seen as one of the most popular homoerotic symbols. The Greek myth of Ganymede, a beautiful youth who was abducted by Zeus in the form of an eagle, has also been a recurring theme in queer art.

The use of coded language also extended well beyond visual symbols. Like Polari, for example — a secret British slang used by gay men allowed them to speak freely without the fear of arrest.

Some important examples of contemporary LGBTQ artists include:

David Wojnarowicz: A multidisciplinary artist, Wojnarowicz's work often incorporated queer themes and imagery, addressing issues such as the AIDS crisis, homophobia, and censorship. His art was deeply influenced by his own experiences as a gay man and activist.

Catherine Opie: A photographer known for her portraits of LGBTQ+ individuals and communities, Opie's work explores themes of identity, gender, and sexuality. Her photographs often reference historical art, such as classical portraiture, to challenge traditional representations of gender and sexuality.

Kehinde Wiley: A painter who reinterprets classical European portraiture, Wiley's work often features Black and LGBTQ+ subjects in positions of power and prominence. By placing these individuals in historical contexts, Wiley challenges traditional art historical narratives and highlights the importance of representation.

Zanele Muholi: A South African photographer and visual activist, Muholi's work focuses on documenting the lives of Black LGBTQ+ individuals in South Africa. Their photographs often reference historical art and visual languages to challenge stereotypes and raise awareness about the experiences of marginalized communities.

These artists, among others, engage with queer symbols and visual languages from the past to create new narratives and challenge traditional representations of LGBTQ+ individuals in art.

Our LGBTQ art collections include...

Gay Astronauts
Gay Cowboys
Lesbian Cowgirls
Gay Gardens
Queer Taxonomies

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South America: Argentina, Brazil

Europe: Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Faroe Islands, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Guernsey, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Isle of Man, Italy, Jersey, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Vatican City

Middle East & Asia: Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Türkiye, United Arab Emirates, Vietnam

Africa: South Africa

Oceania: Australia, New Zealand

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Average shipping times:

USA: 2-5 days — Canada: 3-8 days — UK: 2-5 days — Europe: 3-6 days — Australia: 2-5 days — New Zealand: 3-8 days — Rest of the world: 2-4 weeks

Returns and Exchanges

1. You're welcome to open a return / exchange request within 30 days of your order's delivery. All items for return must be delivered back in their original condition, with their original packaging included.

2. No guarantees your return will be approved if you send items back to before the approval of your return request

3. No returns, refunds or exchanges on discounted or sale items

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