Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

Enchanting Japanese Bird Art Phone Cases from Ohara Koson

Japanese Woodblock Art Prints x Smartphone Accessories

Bird watching is a popular pastime that has been enjoyed by people around the world for centuries. Japan, in particular, has a rich history of incorporating birds into their art and culture. One such artist that stands out is Ohara Koson, who contributed significantly to the Shin Hanga movement in the early 1900s.

Shin Hanga means "new prints" and is characterized by using traditional woodcut techniques but with a contemporary twist. Japanese woodblock printing, also known as Ukiyo-e, has become increasingly popular in recent years because of its unique appearance and traditional roots. 

Japanese bird art phone cases have become a new trend incorporating this culture into everyday life. TobyLeon, for example, has a range of phone cases inspired by Ohara Koson's artwork that combines traditional Japanese art with modern technology. In this listicle, we will review the best Japanese bird art phone cases inspired by Ohara Koson and explain how they can benefit customers.

1.

Japanese Bird on Maple by Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Japanese Bird on Maple by Ohara Koson phone case features an elegant illustration of a bird perched on a maple branch, colored in striking hues of green and yellow. The artwork is reminiscent of traditional Japanese art styles while possessing a modern twist. The phone case is made from durable plastic and has a slim design, making it easy to grip and fit snugly into your pocket.

The main benefit of this phone case is its aesthetic appeal; it's perfect for bird lovers or anyone interested in Japanese art. The detailed artwork is intricate and visually stunning, making it a great conversation starter. Additionally, the phone case is functional and perfect for those looking to protect their phone against everyday wear and tear.

2.

Birds Feeding By Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Birds Feeding by Ohara Koson phone case features an illustration of a mother bird feeding her baby, creating a peaceful and serene atmosphere. The muted color palette creates a calming effect, making it ideal for anyone looking for a peaceful phone case. Similar to the Japanese Bird on Maple phone case, this product is made from durable plastic with a slim profile.

The main benefit of this phone case is its tranquil design that evokes peacefulness and serenity. It's perfect for people who enjoy the simple things in life and want to reflect that in their device. Despite its subtle appearance, this phone case is still eye-catching and sure to grab the attention of others.

3.

Japanese Bird On Branch By Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Japanese Bird on Branch by Ohara Koson phone case boasts an elaborate illustration of a bird perched on a branch. The vibrant colors and details of the image take center stage and capture the viewer's eye. The phone case is made from a hard plastic outer shell with a TPU liner for added protection. The slim design makes it practical and stylish. 

The main benefit of this phone case is its striking imagery. The ornate design draws from traditional Japanese art and exemplifies the essence of beauty in nature. Additionally, the phone case itself provides additional protection for your device without compromising on appearance. 

4.

Kingfisher Hunting By Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Kingfisher Hunting by Ohara Koson phone case represents a hunting kingfisher in all its glory. The colorful design is bold and inspiring, creating a sense of energy and dynamism. The phone case is also made from high-quality materials and provides optimal protection for your phone.

The main benefit of this phone case lies in the strength of its representation of the kingfisher. It allows you to carry a symbol of strength and power wherever you go. The design is truly inspiring and perfect for those who need that boost of confidence.

5.

Ring Sparrows At Wisteria By Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Ring Sparrows at Wisteria by Ohara Koson phone case features an image of ring sparrows perched on a wisteria branch. The phone case's bright pink hue immediately catches your eye and creates warmth and tranquility. The phone case is made from robust materials and has a slim drop-resistant design.

The main benefit of this phone case is its cheerful color palette that inspires a sense of joy and positivity. The detailed illustration is perfect for those who appreciate classic Japanese art styles. The combination of pleasing aesthetics and functionality makes it an excellent choice for any phone owner.

6.

Sparrow On Blooming Magnolia Branch By Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Sparrow on Blooming Magnolia Branch by Ohara Koson phone case showcases an image of a sparrow resting on a blooming magnolia branch. The design utilizes soft pastel colors that create a gentle, relaxing atmosphere. The case itself is crafted from premium materials and fits perfectly around your device.

The main benefit of this phone case is its peaceful design that evokes a sense of quietude and contemplation. The phone case's delicate artwork blends seamlessly with the phone's functionality, providing both style and protection.

7.

Three Birds In Full Flight By Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Three Birds in Full Flight by Ohara Koson phone case displays three birds in full flight painted in vivid, lively colors. The design creates a sense of motion and energy, perfect for those in search of dynamic inspiration. The phone case's slim design is perfect for everyday use and is compatible with wireless charging. 

The main benefit of this phone case lies in its depiction of birds on the move, instilling a sense of determination and purpose. The illustrious design is sure to draw the eyes of passers-by, all while protecting your phone from accidental damage.

8.

Wisteria And Swallow By Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Wisteria and Swallow by Ohara Koson phone case portrays a swallow gliding over a luscious wisteria branch. The phone case uses pastel hues to create a peaceful, soothing environment. The slim design flawlessly integrates with your phone, hugging every contour of the device.

The main benefit of this phone case is its charming blend of elegance and practicality. The phone case's stunning artwork captures the beauty of Japanese nature, while its precise cutouts provide optimal functionality for daily use.

9.

Tits On Cherry Branch By Ohara Koson iPhone Case

Ohara Koson Bird Art Phone Cases: Japanese Shin Hanga Prints

This Tits on Cherry Branch by Ohara Koson phone case depicts colorful tits sitting on a cherry branch, conveying a sense of purity and innocence. The phone case's hard TPU material offers superior protection against scratches, dust, and impact. Its slim design allows for easy access to buttons and ports.

The main benefit of this phone case is its delicate design and affordable price point. The exquisite artwork embodies the essence of Japanese art and culture, making it the perfect gift for any family member or close friend.

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FAQs

Ohara Koson (1877-1945) was a Japanese painter and woodblock print designer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, known for being part of the shin-hanga ("new prints") movement.

Born in Kanazawa, Japan, as Ohara Matao, he studied painting and design at the Ishikawa Prefecture Technical School and later with the painter Suzuki Kason. Koson was famous as a master of kachō-e (bird-and-flower) designs and created around 500 prints throughout his prolific career. He worked with various publishers, such as Akiyama Buemon, Matsuki Heikichi, Watanabe Shōzaburō, and Kawaguchi, signing his work with different names, including Ohara Hōson, Ohara Shōson, and Ohara Koson. His prints were exhibited abroad and sold well, particularly in the United States.

Japanese woodblock printing, also known as ukiyo-e, is a traditional art form that originated in Japan during the Edo period (1603-1868). The technique involves carving an image into a wooden block, applying ink to the raised areas, and then pressing the block onto paper or fabric to create a print. The process is similar to Western woodcut printmaking but uses water-based inks instead of oil-based inks.

Woodblock printing was initially used in Japan as early as the eighth century to disseminate texts, especially Buddhist scriptures. The technique gained popularity in the Edo period, and ukiyo-e prints typically depicted scenes of worldly pleasures, such as beautiful courtesans, kabuki actors, and landscapes. The prints were known for their vivid colors, bold lines, and flat compositions.

The process of creating a Japanese woodblock print involves several steps. First, the artist designs the image on paper, which is then transferred to a thin, partly transparent paper. The paper is pasted onto a wooden block, usually made of cherry wood, and the carver chisels and cuts the design into the block, creating a negative image with the lines and areas to be colored raised in relief. Ink is applied to the surface of the woodblock, and a piece of paper is laid over the top of the inked board. The print is made by rubbing a round pad over the back of the paper. Polychrome prints require a separate carved block for each color, which could number up to twenty.

Japanese woodblock prints have had a significant influence on Western art, particularly on the Impressionist movement, which adopted elements of the ukiyo-e style, such as the use of bold, flat panels of color and close, cropped compositions.

The Shin Hanga movement, meaning "new prints," was an art movement in early 20th-century Japan that revitalized traditional ukiyo-e art rooted in the Edo and Meiji periods (17th–19th century). It emerged during the Taishō and Shōwa periods and was initiated and nurtured by publisher Watanabe Shozaburo. The movement aimed to revive the old tradition of making woodblock prints in a teamwork of artists, skilled carvers, and printers, and a publisher who was responsible for the commercial success.

Shin Hanga artists incorporated Western elements, such as the effects of light and the expression of individual moods, while focusing on strictly traditional themes of landscapes, famous places, beautiful women, kabuki actors, and birds-and-flowers. The movement flourished from around 1915 to 1942 and resumed on a smaller scale after World War II through the 1950s and 1960s.

Some notable artists associated with the Shin Hanga movement include Shinsui Ito, Hasui Kawase, Shunsen Natori, and Kotondo Torii. The Shin Hanga prints are characterized by their vivid colors, bold lines, and flat compositions.

Some renowned Japanese woodblock artists include:

  1. Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849): Known for his iconic print "The Great Wave off Kanagawa" and his series "Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji".
  2. Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858): Famous for his landscape works, specifically the series "The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō" and "The Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō".
  3. Kitagawa Utamaro (1753-1806): Best known for his bijin ōkubi-e prints (large-headed pictures of beautiful women) and detailed nature studies, particularly illustrated books of insects.
  4. Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865): A prolific artist known for his portraits of kabuki actors, sumo wrestlers, and beautiful women.
  5. Ohara Koson (1877-1945): A shin-hanga artist known for his kachō-e (bird-and-flower) designs, creating around 500 prints throughout his career.

These artists are celebrated for their unique styles and contributions to the development of Japanese woodblock printing, which has had a significant influence on Western art, particularly on the Impressionist movement.

These phone cases are plastic. No way around that. But they're produced throughtfully. Printed on demand to reduce energy use and unwanted products going to landfill. We only make cases people order. No dusty stock in a box. And they're all ethical produced by folks paid fairly. Made across regional networks in the USA, EU, UK and AUS. Meaning they're made closer to home carbon — delivering faster with less carbon. So yes, they're plastic... but we don't deal in junk.

Art Phone Case FAQs

All the phone cases in this article provide shock-absorbency, scratch-resistance, a non-slip surface with a design in glorious HD + a raised rim design to protect your screen and camera from accidental damage. They also help guard against oils, dust, and dirt.

Yes indeedy. Meticulous engineering is employed to make sure each art phone case fits precisely over your phone model's camera and audio features, providing a snug and secure fit.

The case uses ultra-luxe inks and UV printing techniques to ensure that the design remains vibrant for an extended period.

The cases may be plastic, but we don't deal in junk. Each art phone case is printed using vibrant water-based eco-inks, for one. And they're all printed on demand — one-by-one, just for you — which helps reduce energy and waste from overproduction. Plus, they're ethically printed in multiple locations across regional networks spanning the USA, UK, EU and AUS. Shipping closer to you means your new art phone case delivers faster and greener. Shipped carbon-neutral via Grassroots Carbon. And we go one better — planting a tree for every phone case purchased via Ecologi.

All our treasure ships free. And these art phone cases are no exception. The case is produced, packed, and shipped within 72 hours. Delivering all around the world without costing a penny for postage.

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